Victorian dating chairs

27-May-2019 07:27

I started buying Staffordshire figures when the collecting bug got me after buying three at an auction.I don't think there could have been any Staffordshire collectors in the room at the time as I got them rather cheaply.With a taller back, designers turned their collective attention to the chair’s splat, the vertical piece that runs up the center.Woodworkers used the splat for carving, while artisans used it as a canvas for japanning, which was a European variation on Asian lacquerwork.No piece of antique or vintage furniture conveys as much personality and says as much about its owner as a chair, whether it’s a side chair in a hallway, a set of matching chairs in the dining room, or a unique rocking chair on the front porch. The ancient Egyptians had stools, and even wooden folding chairs, with leather seats and fine joinery techniques.The Greeks and Romans came up with chair designs that are still in use today.See our navigation at left to find information on the various forms and styles of antique chairs.Due to the sheer number of chair styles, we have chosen only the more popular and collectible items.

antique Chairs, Cabinets, Chests, Beds, Credenzas and more.Fixed upholstery sometimes replaced loose cushions and after 1660 woven cane-work - introduced from the East Indies - was fashionably seen on the seats, and often the backs too, of most chairs.Chairs were increasingly made in sets, I comprising both arm and single chairs.Before this discovery, there were no colours that could stand the high temperatures of the glazing kilns.Prior to this discovery, only overglaze enamel colours, applied after glazing, were used on figures, a method that was to continue alongside the use of cobalt blue.

antique Chairs, Cabinets, Chests, Beds, Credenzas and more.Fixed upholstery sometimes replaced loose cushions and after 1660 woven cane-work - introduced from the East Indies - was fashionably seen on the seats, and often the backs too, of most chairs.Chairs were increasingly made in sets, I comprising both arm and single chairs.Before this discovery, there were no colours that could stand the high temperatures of the glazing kilns.Prior to this discovery, only overglaze enamel colours, applied after glazing, were used on figures, a method that was to continue alongside the use of cobalt blue.By the 17th century, the chair was becoming something of a small throne, with open arms and legs (called a fanteuil in France), a high padded back (the arms and seat were often also padded), and lots of gilt wood.