Average time of dating before engagement

02-Jan-2020 06:18

The expression "act in haste repent at leisure" is not always accurate.

Whether you date for a few months, a few years or a few decades it is hard to know what is best.

The question above could be put into a category along with questions such as "how long is a piece of string?

" The answer will be different depending on who you ask and the circumstances leading up to the beginning of the relationship.

I get asked a lot of relationship-themed questions given where I work, and one of them is from women with boyfriends who want to know how long to wait for the ring.

These aren’t women who have been dating for two months, but rather women who are in long-term relationships.

They have seemingly great mates who have jobs and call their moms and open doors to restaurants- but haven’t yet popped the question.

Five months: "We were in love and wanted to start the rest of our lives together.No matter where in the US you live, women, on average, get engaged about 2 years earlier than men.The one place there is a slight difference in overall age is the northeast where both men and women get engaged about a year later than the rest of the country. ”If your intention is to get engaged asap, we hope you live in the midwest and have dated 3.4 years.Despite all the wedding travel expenses you're likely occurring, don't let this fact get you down. These are all just averages, and what's right for someone else, may not always be what makes sense for you.

Five months: "We were in love and wanted to start the rest of our lives together.

No matter where in the US you live, women, on average, get engaged about 2 years earlier than men.

The one place there is a slight difference in overall age is the northeast where both men and women get engaged about a year later than the rest of the country.

”If your intention is to get engaged asap, we hope you live in the midwest and have dated 3.4 years.

Despite all the wedding travel expenses you're likely occurring, don't let this fact get you down. These are all just averages, and what's right for someone else, may not always be what makes sense for you.

Ted Huston, a leading researcher on transitions in relationships, marriage and parenthood, followed couples for 13 years starting in 1979.